Nine Queens

Nine Queens

Country: Argentina
Release Date: August 31, 2000
Genre(s): Drama / Thriller
Director: Fabián Bielinsky
Cast: Gastón Pauls, Ricardo Darín, Leticia Brédice, Tomás Fonzi ...
Awards: Argentinean Film Critics Association Awards; Bogota Film Festival: Audience Awar; Cognac Festival du Film Policier; Lima Latin American Film Festival; MTV Movie Awards, Latin America ...

Our Score
7.8
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User Score:
2 votes
8.5

Nine Queens

Nine QueensNine Queens (Spanish: Nueve Reinas) is an Argentine crime drama film written and directed by Fabián Bielinsky. The picture features Gastón Pauls, Ricardo Darín, Leticia Brédice, and Tomás Fonzi, among others. The film was nominated for 28 awards and won 21 of them.

The film’s screenplay was adapted in the 2004 film Criminal. It was also used as a basis for the Indian film Bluffmaster! (2005) and the Malayalam film Gulumal (2009).


Plot

Early one morning, Marcos observes Juan successfully pulling off a bill-changing scam on a cashier, and then getting caught as he attempts to pull the same trick on the next shift. Marcos steps in, claiming to be a policeman, and drags Juan out of the store. Once they are back on the street, Marcos reveals himself to be a fellow swindler with a game of much higher stakes in mind, and he invites Juan to be his partner in crime. A once-in-a-lifetime scheme seemingly falls into their laps – an old-time con man enlists them to sell a forged set of extremely valuable rare stamps, The Nine Queens. The tricky negotiations that ensue bring into the picture a cast of suspicious characters, including Marcos’ sister Valeria, their younger brother Federico and a slew of thieves, conmen and pickpockets. As the deceptions mount, it becomes more and more difficult to figure out who is conning whom.


Awards


Datasheet

Directed by: Fabián Bielinsky
Produced by: Cecilia Bossi and Pablo Bossi
Written by: Fabián Bielinsky
Cast: Gastón Pauls, Ricardo Darín, Leticia Brédice, Tomás Fonzi …
Music by: César Lerner
Cinematography: Marcelo Camorino
Editing by: Sergio Zottola
Release date: August 31, 2000
Running time: 114 minutes
Country: Argentina
Language: Spanish


Amazon’s Review

Nine Queens joins a line of sly thrillers about master-pupil con artists and games within games within games that includes The Sting, House of Games, and Heist. In the first five minutes, we watch an overt scam–a young Argentinian named Juan (Gastón Pauls) running the two-10s-for-a-5 hornswoggle on a convenience store clerk–then find that we have been tricked along with the bystanders as another brand of deception kicks in. And so it goes as Juan, with both trepidation and excitement, drifts into partnership for a day with an older, more cosmopolitan conman, Marcos (Ricardo Darín). Knocking around Buenos Aires–from gritty downtown to cozy neighborhood side streets to a swank hotel where wealth murmurs behind every door–these damnably resourceful scoundrels try not to miss a bet, including an epic swindle involving the titular “Nine Queens,” a set of ultrarare stamps. Writer-director Fabián Bielinsky keeps a taut rein on everything, including his own cleverness. The end result is an entertainment as bracingly disciplined as it is ingenious. –Richard T. Jameson

From The New Yorker
The great Argentinean actor Ricardo Darín plays an experienced grifter who takes a young hopeful (Gastón Pauls) into his confidence game. The seductive and manipulative camerawork and the sly-as-a-fox performance by Darín combine to make a slippery caper movie. There are elements of Mamet and Hitchcock throughout, but the director, Fabián Bielinsky, uses these influences amusingly and crafts an unpredictable entertainment. In Spanish. -Bruce Diones
Copyright © 2006 The New Yorker

From the Back Cover
Welcome to a world of suspicion, betrayal, and intrigue, where two small-time grifters team up to pull off a big-time score involving a set of valuable counterfeit stamps known as the Nine Queens. But when the rules of the con game unexpectedly change, the two crooks find themselves pitted against each other in this taut psychological thriller in which neither the players, nor the audience, knows for sure who is playing whom.


Amazon Customer Reviews

Too much praise for a movie that isn’t overly well-known? By M. B. Alcat
“Nine Queens”, or “Nueve Reinas” in its original Spanish title, is one of the more entertaining Argentinian movies I’ve watched so far. The dialogue is witty, the action doesn’t stop, and the acting is flawless. Too much praise for a movie that isn’t overly well-known?. Well, even good things are not widely recognized to be so sometimes, and this is one of those occasions.

The theme of the movie is not overly original: two conmen trying to pull off a scam that involves a set of stamps (the “Nine Queens”), and a lot of money. But what makes this movie interesting is how that idea is developed, managing to surprise the spectator until the very end. The director (Fabián Bielinsky) also wrote the script, that won a National Prize in Argentina.

Scam after scam, you will feel you are taking part of the many “adventures” of a very seasoned Marcos (Ricardo Darín) and an endearingly young and idealistic Juan (Gastón Pauls) in their quest to become rich, albeit for very different reasons. The question is, who is conning whom?.

All in all, I think you will thoroughly like this movie. The story and the acting are great, and so is the beautiful setting, the city of Buenos Aires. Watch it, and enjoy :)

Belen Alcat

Conning the Con By Brian Bunton
Conning the con. It’s a concept almost as old as conning itself. But the story in “Nine Queens”, written and directed by Fabian Bielinsky as the winner of a Project Greenlight-style contest, takes a different spin. Who is the real conman? And what is the real con?

“Nine Queens” is the story of two conmen. One is a seasoned pro, the other a small-time hack. Each has his own family responsibilities (or lack thereof). And each is very talented at getting what he wants. The older, more experienced con decides to take the young guy on as his partner for the day. Think of it as a sort of “Training Day” for crooks. Oops, I’m sorry, they’re not crooks. Crooks carry guns and use means other than their wit and mental agility to score. These boys are keepin’ it real in Buenos Aires.

And so the plot thickens. The obligitory Big Con of the movie happens to involve nine rare stamps, known as the Nine Queens. Forgeries have been made, and our heroes are on a mission to sell the fakes to a collector who is short on time and cannot guarantee their authenticity. What twists and turns await our beleaguered duo? There are plenty, and much of the fun of this movie is watching it unfold.

The movie even works on a level if you don’t care about the mystery what is really going on. Toward the beginning, each sequence exposes you to a series of one-upsmanship. One rips off a convenience store, the other rips off a coffee shop. Then one gets money free-will from a stranger in her house, the other gets a purse free-will from a woman in an elevator. And on it goes. By the time things get hot and heavy, we hardly notice that it continues, but the stakes get higher and paranoia reigns.

The final enjoyable aspect of this film is the acting performances. Strong performances by the three leads, as they’re able to glide through this movie with slick moves and even slicker tongues. While it’s tried in most Hollywood films, it works in this one due to the strong script. The words match the characters. Unfortunately, the supporting cast isn’t as talented. The younger brother and the creator of the forgeries felt like they walked in off the street. However, it doesn’t distract from the overall feel of the movie as much as you might think.

All in all, this is a comedy about trust. Trust in your partner. Trust in yourself. Trust in your family. Even trust in complete strangers. But most of all, for the director, it’s about trust in your audience. Just after you feel that you’re supposed to get a twist, the film will let you revel in it for a beat, then expose it to all its glory. In no movie I’ve seen has this worked so satisfyingly well. And the audience is richly rewarded.

Fascinate unpredectible and original!! By A Customer
Early one morning, Marcos observes Juan successfully pulling off a bill-changing scam on a cashier, and then getting caught as he attempts to pull the same trick on the next shift. Marcos steps in, claiming to be a policeman, and drags Juan out of the store. Once they are back on the street, Marcos reveals himself to be a fellow swindler with a game of much higher stakes in mind, and he invites Juan to be his partner in crime. A once-in-a-lifetime scheme seemingly falls into their laps – an old-time con man enlists them to sell a forged set of extremely valuable rare stamps, The Nine Queens. The tricky negotiations that ensue bring into the picture a cast of suspicious characters, including Marcos’ sister Valeria, their younger brother Federico and a slew of thieves, conmen and pickpockets. As the deceptions mount, it becomes more and more difficult to figure out who is conning whom.
This movie make you see that thieves are around you all the time in every place, at every moment. This excelent movie catch you in a fascinate story that you won’t imaginate what the end is.

Don’t miss it.

Nine Queens, 8.5 out of 10 based on 2 ratings

Images

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Trailers

Nine Queens Play
Nine Queens
Nine Queens (Spanish: Nueve Reinas) is an Argentine crime drama film written and directed by Fabián Bielinsky. The picture features Gastón Pauls, Ricardo Darín, Leticia Brédice, and Tomás Fonzi, among others. The film was nominated for 28 awards and won 21 of them. The film’s screenplay was adapted in...
Posted 08 Sep 2011

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Categories: Argentine movies, Images, Synopsis, Trailers

3 Comments

  1. [...] favourite Argentine movie on the list?Diarios de motocicleta (2004)El secreto de sus ojos (2009)Nueve reinas (2000)El hijo de la novia (2001)El aura (2005)XXY (2007)El método (2005)Plata quemada (2000)La [...]

  2. [...] la mujer araña de Héctor Babenco, 1985 (Brasil)La ley de Herodes de Luis Estrada, 1999 (México)Nueve Reinas de Fabián Bielinski, 2000 (Argentina)La vendedora de rosas de Víctor Gaviria, 1990 [...]

  3. The Aura | IberoAmericanMovies.com
    19 Sep 2012, 5:58 am

    [...] a superb movie by Fabián Bielinsky, and although very much different from his earlier creation, Nine Queens, has his unmistakable touch. Bielinsky has a talent for psychological thrillers and his ability to [...]

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